Episode V – The Last DevOps

--Originally published at The Sugar team workspace blog

This is the last part of a DevOps related topics series:

I’ll be talking about the previous blogposts, if you want to read them here they are:

Bring balance to DevOps culture, image from this medium post

So… DevOps?

Though the 3 previous parts, we practiced our Continuos Integration. We built and test (and did some kind of monitoring) to a central repository after “automated” builds tests are run.

“Continuous Integration doesn’t get rid of bugs, but it does make them dramatically easier to find and remove.”

Martin Fowler, another guru of software as Kent Beck

So I learned that DevOps is helpful for finding errors quicker than waiting until the end. Sometimes you don’t know the failures that might happen outside the local environment.

The Goats

Cheating a bit with Jenkins

Jenkins is a good option if you want to build at a bigger scale. This is an open source automatization server written in Java, advantages of using it:

  • Continuous integration an delivery
  • “Easy” installation and configuration
  • Has hundreds of plugins
  • Extensible and Distributed.

I know that a lot of companies use Jenkins because it makes the DevOps practices a lot easier, since it has a lot of flexibility.

But not everything is color pink. One of its advantages can be a double edge sword, the fact that is OpenSource. Therefore some issues might take longer to fix. Also the migration from an old instance to the newest is a big pain (real work-life situation).

Excise Task

By this day, I had this question twice in my Testing course exam, “What’s the deal with excise

Continue reading "Episode V – The Last DevOps"

Episode III – The Return of DevOps (SSH & Git)

--Originally published at The Sugar team workspace blog

Welcome back to a series of blogposts about how to set up a little server in a Linux Virtual Machine, in this post we will lean about Github and SSH

if you are not familiar to the topic you can go to the first or second part of the series

Ensure that you have your GitHub account.

Before you start you should have a Github account.

You can follow me @kevintroko (for some reason)

Ensure that you have a repository created for testing.

If you followed the last part we had a web server created in node, we will use this. This will be our root.

Setup your GitHub two-factor authentication.

This part is a step forward process and Github explain it 100 times better than me, but I’ll explain it anyways in case you don’t want to move to another site. It’s really nothing from the other world, is more just following a series of steps:

Go tho the git setting and click in the security tab


Click the enable two factor button

Follow the steps in the site

⚠ ⚠ DONT FORGET TO SAVE YOUR RECOVERY CODES ⚠⚠

They send you a mai anyways

You are ready

Github SSH keys Setup

This is a little bit harder than the last step, the Github team explain it as well (though some commands don’t work the same for ubuntu)

ssh-keygen -t rsa -b 4096 will create a SSH key with a 4096 encryption
ssh-keygen -t rsa -b 4096 -C “put your own email”
They will ask you for the passphrase
Enter your pass phrase from the last step
It will generate the next output
eval the ssh agent
The GitHub page recommend to get the RSA key like this, but ubuntu won’t recognize natively this command, you can just cat
Continue reading "Episode III – The Return of DevOps (SSH & Git)"

Episode II – DevOps Strikes Back

--Originally published at The Sugar team workspace blog

Welcome to a series of blogposts about how to set up a little server in a Linux Virtual Machine, if you are not familiar to the topic you can a little more about in here (which is the first part of the series)

Install a Linux distribution

For this task, I chose the Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS which runs in Virtual Box. This is the same I use for other courses (maybe this is not a good idea). If you would like to download the same Linux distribution, you can install this “old” mini iso from ubuntu.

Lovely ubuntu running in my VM

Other Linux distributions (thanks to @ken_bauer for the links) :

Install support for your development environment.

The next step you can choose the language you like the most, but for this project I will use Java. Here is a very well explained tutorial in case you want to install Java in your Linux system

Java download process example
Java in action

Next step will be to set up the Github for pushing into a git repository

git in action, this is very important for the future steps

Setup web deployment.

I decided to use Node.js as my option for the web development. Be careful because for the Linux 18.04.1 LTS the typical node command has to be instead nodejs as seen in the next example

Node js server running on local host port 8080

Setup your 

Continue reading "Episode II – DevOps Strikes Back"