Alice and Bob, their story

--Originally published at Ce qui est chouette

The brief description provided by Coursera‘s Cyptography I course by the University of Stanford paints cryptography as a tool for protecting information in computer systems. What I’ll attempt to cover in this post is cryptography’s real-world application, why it is needed.

First let’s deal with some basic stuff regarding cryptography, starting with the classic Alice, Bob and that bastard Eve who’s always meddling, she’s more of a Lilith if you asked me. Let’s say Alice has the sudden urge to communicate some secret message to Bob, perhaps she’s going to confess her love, but Eve also likes Bob, and Alice knows this. She can’t met Bob in person, Eve would find out, she lives close by and would get in the way. THANK GOD for the cryptography course Bob and Alice took years ago, where they learned about symmetric and asymmetric cryptography . . .

 

Alice and Bob, their story
Secured! by Sean T. Evans on Flickr under a CC License.

Sidenote to Explain Asymmetric and Symmetric Cryptography

Based on this post on Synopsys. Encryption uses an algorithm and a key to turn plaintext, the message, into ciphertext, the encrypted message that you can then send. Symmetric Encryption uses the same key for both encryption and decryption of a message, its fast and can be used  for large amounts of data, like encrypting a hard drive, the hard part is keeping that key secured. Asymmetric encryption keeps a pair of keys, a private one and a public one, that can be distributed anywhere to interact with your messages. Plaintext encrypted with a private key can only be decrypted by its corresponding public counterpart, and vice versa. A message can also be signed using your private key, so that others may decrypt the signature with your public key and verify it was sent by you. This type of encryption, though, is slow and can only be used to encrypt data smaller than the key.

Back to the gossip

Alice decided to use Bob‘s public key to encrypt her confession, Eve had a man-in-the-middle software running in Bob‘s network, and caught the message, she didn’t understood it, however, and decided to let it through, ignorant to the fact that she was about to lose Bob, her Bob, to Alice‘s encrypted message. Bob received the message and recognized the gibberish as an encrypted message, like the ones he had worked with. Bob got a hold of his private key and decrypted the message, the surprising confession got to him, and to Eve‘s dismay, reciprocated.

That’s not reality! Well, Alice is the everyday user, Bob is the destination of every operation Alice does online, and Eve is third-parties, like government agencies, interfering in these interactions. This everyday interaction is why encryption is important, to keep your privacy. These third-parties’ goal is to break these encryption algorithms, by cracking it themselves or demanding a backdoor from the developers, which was the case in the FBI-Apple encryption dispute or the whole Snowden situation, of which there’s a cool John Oliver video.

XOXO, crypto guy

International Game – TO-DO Week 13

--Originally published at That Class Blog

Okay, so now I have again stuff to do! Yay! 3 issues to be exact! 2 that I guess i’mgoing to like, and 1 that I must have. This week, and remaining sprint will be focused in incorporating multiple languages to our game. So my 3 issues are mostly related to that.

International Game – TO-DO Week 13
“Mini Rockefeller Plaza” by Sunny Ripert (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/). Taken from https://www.flickr.com/photos/sunfox/5084842773
  1. Update the level schema and already uploaded levels, so that they have only a boolean property called text. If true, the level loader must get the level data.
  2. Create a new schema, for the level texts. It must contain all the languages for the texts of the level.
  3. A new level. it will be level 5.

Yay!

Miguel Montoya
Esperanto Enthusiast
ʕ•ᴥ•ʔ

I kinda did a bit – End of Week 12

--Originally published at That Class Blog

I kinda did a bit – End of Week 12
“IMG_0152” by clement127 (CC BY-NC-ND). From https://www.flickr.com/photos/clement127/8393707617/

Okay, so doing the stuff that Gera asked me to do took me like 10 minutes. Which isn’t much, but it was more than what I estimated. I forgot how much time it takes to move stuff in the game window. Instead of giving to coordinates and creating a square using only the diagonal, it asks for the center coordinate, a high and a width, making my space senses go uisndqne… Oh, and to take a bit of initiative, not only I increased the size of the texts, but I also updated the content and added new texts to the level.

I’ve also created and updated some DB scripts. Now we have a remove level script, and there are some comments in most of the scripts to make a more specific query to the DB.

And… yeah…

That’s all for now.

I know this blog is late, and I’m sorry ;-;

Miguel Montoya
Esperanto Enthusiast
ʕ•ᴥ•ʔ

Week 11 (1): Now we have some sounds.

--Originally published at Ce qui est chouette

I’ve recruited some voice actors, those being my classmates, and asked them to perform questionable sounds. Using a globally defined object, SOUNDS, I load the soundfiles and play them whenever they are needed. As of now we have the following sounds: background musicjumpbounce off surfacefiring a projectile, and killing an enemy.

Week 11 (1): Now we have some sounds.
Swans @ Black Cat by Erin M on Flickr under a CC License.

Next week I’ll be adding more sounds.

– Still the sound guy.

Vehicle cybersecurity

--Originally published at Hermes's Blog

Vehicle cybersecurity

Today’s behicles feature driver assistance, like collision warning, automatic emergency braking and safety vehicle communications. The NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Security Administration) is exploring the full spectrum of its tools to ensure these technologies are deployed safely and effectively. It encourages the implementation of NIST Cybersecurity Framework. NHTSA promotes a multi-layered approach to cybersecurity by focusing on a vehicle’s entry points, both wireless and wired.

Malicious exploitation of security vulnerabilities in connected cars is a major problem, with news stories of hacking interfering with consumer acceptance of the current and future capabilities of vehicles.

The first well known security compromise of a smart vehicle, a 2014 Jeep Cherokee was hacked by security reserchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek in 2015, they were able to turn the steering wheel, disable the brakes and shut the engine down, all remotely. They also discovered that they could access thousands of other vehicles that were using the Uconnect entertainment and navigation system, common in Dodge, Jeep and chrysler vehicles.

It is good to know that automotive manufacturers and transportation compaines are well informed about these problems and are taking it very seriously, hiring cybersecurity experts as part of a concerted auto industry effort to greatly increase the strength of security features in cars.

Sources:

https://www.nhtsa.gov/technology-innovation/vehicle-cybersecurity

https://hackernoon.com/smart-car-hacking-a-major-problem-for-iot-a66c14562419

I need something – TO-DO Week 12

--Originally published at That Class Blog

I need something to do.

I have no issues.

I’m sad. ب_ب

I need something – TO-DO Week 12
“Han’s Solo 2/2” by Gerry Dulay (CC BY-NC). From https://www.flickr.com/photos/gerrysnaps/14083936239/

This time I don’t know what else to do. And I can’t think of any ideas like last week when I did the new enemy.

Gerardo asked me to change the size of the texts in level 1. So I plan to do that. But I mean, that will take me less than 5 minutes to get all the texts to look nice.

I guess I can make some updates to the database. I realized that the level where I implemented the new enemy didn’t make it properly to the DB. So I will get my hand into that.

Well… cheerio.

Miguel Montoya
Esperanto enthusiast
ʕ•ᴥ•ʔ

Inmortal- End of week 11

--Originally published at That Class Blog

So this week I worked in the addition of a new enemy. This enemy is immortal, or at least to our knowledge, it is immune to bullets. This enemy is yellow (As if it was a shield), and those are the only visual differences in of the enemy. Obviously if it can’t be destroyed, it won’t give any points and thus it won’t display any text on hit.
And I would love to show here a little GIF of the enemy, but there are some sound issues that don’t let the game load (Not even an specific level). And I’m not blaming anyone, the issue only appears until devices pulled the repository, not before making the push.

Inmortal- End of week 11
“No Weapons” by Julien (CC BY-NC-ND). From https://www.flickr.com/photos/djou/5506909810

My teammates worked this week in the sound system (Using p5.play, please check our README to see every framework we are using). They also worked regarding the implementation of new walls and objects (I helped a little bit on regarding the Mongoose level schema).