Flipped Learning

--Originally published at richardctc201

Flipped learning is an innovative, revolutionary way of ‘teaching’ that is having its bum in universities all around the world. For the wsq04, I read Afraj Gill´s blog post about the way that A´s grades spoiled his learning process. Afraj blames the educational system based in obtaining the highest possible grade at all price for mispricing the real goal of education: implementing the acquired knowledge in real life. Afraj says that although he always obtained the highest grades, and he was priced with a lot of scholarships and rewards, he realized that he had never used his knowledge in real life situations. He thinks that grades are the biggest obstacles for trully learning because students memorize big quantities of information in their short-term memory, causing that all those concepts are not ‘fully digested’ by the brain, and finally forgotten.

I agree with Afraj´s point of view. I’m used to obtain the highest grades, but I have always thought that someone´s intelligence isn’t based in answering a sheet of paper nor ‘macheteando’ (colloquial way in Mexico to describe the action of memorizing a big quantity of data) every single word that the teacher says in a class. I reflected about the part where Afraj talks about Finnish educational system (the best in the world) where people don’t attend school until 7 years old, and don’t present tests until their teenagers. In my point of view, Mexico needs to change something in its educational strategy (because it sucks!).

I searched for additional information about this topic and found an article of the University of Queensland, Australia that describes a little more how Flipped classrooms works, but the really interesting part of this article is that in the end, there are shown some benefits of the flipped learning style. I specially liked two of them: curate content, students gathering their own sources, and providing opportunities for discourse, the fact that an independent learning brings a bunch of different points of views of the students resulting in an enriching dialogue because they not only talk about what the professor said but also their own ideas.

Here I leave the link to that Queensland article; it is very interesting, and I expect that it gives more information of this revolutionary topic to my classmates:

http://www.uq.edu.au/teach/flipped-classroom/what-is-fc.html

 

 


Flipped Learning

Flipped Learning

I decided to read the article for the course that talks about an A+ student that rgrets his grades (I’ll leave the link at the en of the post just in case you want to check it out).

For me, this whole flipped learning thing it’s actually not new and that’s because it’s not the first time I’ve worked with Ken. I had the privilege of being his student one year ago in the Python programming course.

As I said back then, I think flipped learning classes are way better than traditional classes because there is more teacher-student interaction, therefore, the students are always active and they learn more and easier.

On the other hand, one problem that might appear with flipped classes is that the students may not do their lectures at home, and when it comes to do the class activities they won’t know what to do or how to do it.

In conclusion, the first thing that the teacher and the students need to do is to agree on how they’re going to work. The students will have to do their homework lectures and be willing to work in teams, and the teachers will need to be able to answer any questions about the subject and give the students activities so they can interact with each other and the teacher himself so that the students fully understand and have their questions/doubts clearly answered.

 

Here’s the link to the article about the A+ student I told you at the beginning of this post:

http://www.joebower.org/2013/02/an-student-regrets-his-grades.html

Here’s also a flipped learning video I really like and would want you to watch it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4a7NbUIr_iQ

 

Flipped Learning

I decided to read the article for the course that talks about an A+ student that rgrets his grades (I’ll leave the link at the en of the post just in case you want to check it out).

For me, this whole flipped learning thing it’s actually not new and that’s because it’s not the first time I’ve worked with Ken. I had the privilege of being his student one year ago in the Python programming course.

As I said back then, I think flipped learning classes are way better than traditional classes because there is more teacher-student interaction, therefore, the students are always active and they learn more and easier.

On the other hand, one problem that might appear with flipped classes is that the students may not do their lectures at home, and when it comes to do the class activities they won’t know what to do or how to do it.

In conclusion, the first thing that the teacher and the students need to do is to agree on how they’re going to work. The students will have to do their homework lectures and be willing to work in teams, and the teachers will need to be able to answer any questions about the subject and give the students activities so they can interact with each other and the teacher himself so that the students fully understand and have their questions/doubts clearly answered.

 

Here’s the link to the article about the A+ student I told you at the beginning of this post:

http://www.joebower.org/2013/02/an-student-regrets-his-grades.html

Here’s also a flipped learning video I really like and would want you to watch it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4a7NbUIr_iQ

 

Flipped Learning

I decided to read the article for the course that talks about an A+ student that rgrets his grades (I’ll leave the link at the en of the post just in case you want to check it out).

For me, this whole flipped learning thing it’s actually not new and that’s because it’s not the first time I’ve worked with Ken. I had the privilege of being his student one year ago in the Python programming course.

As I said back then, I think flipped learning classes are way better than traditional classes because there is more teacher-student interaction, therefore, the students are always active and they learn more and easier.

On the other hand, one problem that might appear with flipped classes is that the students may not do their lectures at home, and when it comes to do the class activities they won’t know what to do or how to do it.

In conclusion, the first thing that the teacher and the students need to do is to agree on how they’re going to work. The students will have to do their homework lectures and be willing to work in teams, and the teachers will need to be able to answer any questions about the subject and give the students activities so they can interact with each other and the teacher himself so that the students fully understand and have their questions/doubts clearly answered.

 

Here’s the link to the article about the A+ student I told you at the beginning of this post:

http://www.joebower.org/2013/02/an-student-regrets-his-grades.html

Here’s also a flipped learning video I really like and would want you to watch it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4a7NbUIr_iQ

 

Flipped Learning

--Originally published at TC201 Winter 2016 Jorge

I decided to read the article for the course that talks about an A+ student that rgrets his grades (I'll leave the link at the en of the post just in case you want to check it out).

For me, this whole flipped learning thing it's actually not new and that's because it's not the first time I've worked with Ken. I had the privilege of being his student one year ago in the Python programming course.

As I said back then, I think flipped learning classes are way better than traditional classes because there is more teacher-student interaction, therefore, the students are always active and they learn more and easier.

On the other hand, one problem that might appear with flipped classes is that the students may not do their lectures at home, and when it comes to do the class activities they won't know what to do or how to do it.

In conclusion, the first thing that the teacher and the students need to do is to agree on how they're going to work. The students will have to do their homework lectures and be willing to work in teams, and the teachers will need to be able to answer any questions about the subject and give the students activities so they can interact with each other and the teacher himself so that the students fully understand and have their questions/doubts clearly answered.

 

Here's the link to the article about the A+ student I told you at the beginning of this post:

http://www.joebower.org/2013/02/an-student-regrets-his-grades.html

Here's also a flipped learning video I really like and would want you to watch it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4a7NbUIr_iQ

 

Flipped Learning

I decided to read the article for the course that talks about an A+ student that rgrets his grades (I’ll leave the link at the en of the post just in case you want to check it out).

For me, this whole flipped learning thing it’s actually not new and that’s because it’s not the first time I’ve worked with Ken. I had the privilege of being his student one year ago in the Python programming course.

As I said back then, I think flipped learning classes are way better than traditional classes because there is more teacher-student interaction, therefore, the students are always active and they learn more and easier.

On the other hand, one problem that might appear with flipped classes is that the students may not do their lectures at home, and when it comes to do the class activities they won’t know what to do or how to do it.

In conclusion, the first thing that the teacher and the students need to do is to agree on how they’re going to work. The students will have to do their homework lectures and be willing to work in teams, and the teachers will need to be able to answer any questions about the subject and give the students activities so they can interact with each other and the teacher himself so that the students fully understand and have their questions/doubts clearly answered.

 

Here’s the link to the article about the A+ student I told you at the beginning of this post:

http://www.joebower.org/2013/02/an-student-regrets-his-grades.html

Here’s also a flipped learning video I really like and would want you to watch it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4a7NbUIr_iQ

 

WSQ04

--Originally published at chozaoop

Hey there, long time no see (that’s not good), here’s WSQ04; in this WSQ we were requested to read some articles and discuss, make our own comments about them and express how we feel by them.

I’m going to go one by one, just after i read it, i’m typing my opinions here.

“A Lecture From the Lectured”.

I think there’s a different situation here in Tec de Monterrey in comparison to some Universities in US, mostly because the classrooms here are kind of “reduced”, and by that i mean less students, comparing to classes in most Universities which make up to more than 100 students in a whole auditorium, here in Mexico, that’s a lot of people.

But in contrast, it is alike too, we still get lectured and people also get bored from time to time, may not come to class some days, and feel pretty distant to their professor. In this article, students (the lectured) give their own feedback about how they feel, what they feel, things they like and things they don’t, how they wish the professor to be.

These students express that there’s no connection between them and the teacher, feeling that he’s not someone they can speak to, they want to interact with the teacher so the class is not always a lecture, something you can even do on your own, but some dynamic learning in which they break that routine.

“An A+ student regrets his grades”.

Wow, this hitted me up, so Afraj Gill talks about how grading is some stuff from the past, how we need to change the way school is, how they measure your sucess based on some numbers, the way that most students apreciate an A+ on some subject more than what they learned or how they grew.

He discusses the fact that failure is, in most cases, punished by the system rather than teaching the students that, in fact, failure is part of learning and this has to do with one of Ken’s phrases that says “It’s okay to fail”.

Afraj says that actually the culture is a problem and we need to fix this from the ground up, which is a pretty difficult and complex process, but with great rewards.

Showing the Differences between a Traditional and a Flipped Classroom”

Really fun video, showing the contrast between those two type of learning, in my opinion, flipped class seemed more relaxed and flexible, in the way that you interact a lot with your teacher; not everything is just a bunch of theory throwed at your face. Also you have more time to fix some problems you had while reading at home or in this case (physics class) some exercise that gave you problems and such.

Regular class seemed more square, kind of the same you know, taking notes, asking the teacher, trying to comprehend just the theoric part and not even getting a grasp of what it works in the real life.

Obviously we saw that one is teacher-centered and the other is more of student-centered, it makes a lot of sense that classes should be indeed student-centered since there’s always a lot more of students than teachers and guess what? Students are the ones who must learn.

WSQ04

LET’S FLIP

 

 

 


WSQ04

WSQ04 – Flipped Learning

--Originally published at Alan TC201

Flip class is a modern way of teaching, a method were the students get lectured by themselves in home and can ask questions in class, while the normal way is to get lectured in class and get stuck in home because you did not understand something.

WSQ04 – Flipped Learning

I see this method as a way to be more efficient in time, you have more time to ask questions can be prepared for exams. It is common to arrive to a class and be frightened to ask questions because in return you will receive a “you should know this because I lecture the last class” and the student is like “well, I did not get it the last class, so now I’m completely lost”

WSQ04 – Flipped Learning

WSQ04 – Flipped Learning

Memes about this are infinite.

 


WSQ04 – Flipped Learning

#WSQ04-Flipped Learning/#AbolishGrades

--Originally published at diegotc2016

The video was about the differences between a traditional classroom and a flipped classroom. The differences between a flipped classroom and a traditional one are…

#WSQ04-Flipped Learning/#AbolishGrades

Flipped vs Traditional

I have had 4 classes that are flipped, 1 (Fundamentals of Programming) has worked, 2 (Computer Org & OOP) of them have worked for now and one didn’t worked at all (Physics). I think that one of the biggest disadvantages of the flipped learning is that if you don’t read at all outside the classroom you are not going to learn.


#WSQ04-Flipped Learning/#AbolishGrades